compensation

Samoan mum awaits compensation for injured seasonal worker son

Mrs. Leota said the hospital and death certificate confirmed her son’s death was due to measles.

However, prior to contracting measles, Paulo Leota was allegedly stabbed on the back of his head in Australia where he was a seasonal worker.

Mrs Leota told Loop Samoa correspondent, Talaia Mika, that her son’s death was unacceptable.

“Though he had his own family to look after, he was always visiting me and giving me money,” she said.

Brisbane-based Samoan lawyer, Sinaumea Taufao has offered to help the family seek compensation for personal injuries.

Samoan lawyer calls for compensation education for Australia’s seasonal workers

Leota raised the issue following reports of Samoans being injured in the workplace then being sent home without compensation.

He told Loop Samoa correspondent, Talaia Mika that the whole idea came about after consultations with the Consulate, Vaasatia Poloma.

“Because a lot of people who go over for seasonal work, they’re more inclined to get hurt more than any other worker in Australia so that’s why there was an issue because yes there is our liaison officer Aufai in Australia but there’s no one here in Samoa,” he said.

Families 'cheated of Boeing crash compensation'

Lawyers told the BBC that many families were persuaded to sign forms preventing them from taking legal action.

BBC Panorama has discovered that other relatives signed similar agreements after two other crashes, stopping them from suing Boeing in the US courts.

Boeing has declined to comment on the agreements.

All 189 passengers and crew died when the Boeing 737 Max crashed into the sea just 13 minutes after taking off from the Indonesian capital, Jakarta, on 29 October 2018.

Within weeks, relatives were offered compensation by insurance lawyers.

Tahiti court throws out ten nuclear claims

The ruling is in line with last month's expert advice, which took into account a law change that reintroduced a minimum figure of radiation exposure.

Earlier this year, the expert advice was to compensate the claimants.

The law change was inserted into the Finance Act in December reportedly to comply with the Public Health Act.

The veterans groups have been dismayed at the law change, saying now no more applications are likely to succeed.