Domestic violence

Husband charged with murder in Samoa

The 53-year-old woman of Lalomanu was admitted at the Lalomanu District Hospital on 24 July 2019.

Samoa Police said she was a victim of a domestic violence case.

The woman was later transferred to Motootua Hospital and passed away on Monday, 29 July 2019 as a result of her injuries.

Her husband was initially charged by police on causing injury.

An additional charge of murder has been filed in court.

The defendant is scheduled to appear in court on 12 August 2019 for mention.

Reports of domestic violence drop in Samoa

According to the Samoa Observer, the report noted 212 calls related to domestic violence were received by police during the period, a 32 percent reduction on the previous year.

The reduction comes as police in Samoa continue to raise awareness about domestic violence though public awareness campaigns and social media posts.

The report said a total of 4760 crimes were reported and attended to by the police on Upolu island during the period, and 800 on Savai'i.

Samoa father jailed for stabbing wife multiple times

The police said the crime happened in front of the couple's children.

They had been separated for two years when the stabbing occurred in February last year.

Justice Leiataualesa Darrel Clarke said domestic violence in Samoa and other communities around the world is at such a level of frequency and seriousness that deterrent sentences are generally necessary.

Samoa village councils key to ending domestic violence

Newsline Samoa reported the Minister for Women and Community Development, Tuitama Leao Talalelei Tuitama, said that so far 40 percent of Samoa villages have by-laws in place to curb domestic violence.

Tuitama said research by his ministry has confirmed that the influence of the village council is crucial to solving the problem of domestic violence.

     

Samoa's churches urged to help stop violence against women

The report, titled Church Responses To Gender-Based Violence Against Women in Samoa, examines how Samoa's social, cultural and religious systems act to sustain the nation's high rates of violence against women.

The leader of the project, Mercy Ah-Siu Maliko, said in order for churches to achieve this, they must first include women in their ministry work.

Dr Maliko, who has Samoan heritage, said the church needs to revise its interpretation that legitimises the submission of women, that legitimises the customs and rules that oppress women.

Horror stories shared at Samoa anti-violence forum

"What it looks like, is that the abuser uses certain patterns of behaviour to establish and maintain power and control over their partner," she said.

"Although often, it includes physical violence, physical violence doesn't have to be necessarily present. There is verbal abuse, the name calling the put downs. You're fat you're ugly you're stupid, you're a whore."

The panel discussion was part of the United Nations' Spotlight Initiative To Eliminate Violence Against Women and Girls.

Samoa church leader says domestic violence God's punishment

Catholic Deacon Kasiano Le'aupepe made the comment at a forum organised by the national human rights institution and UN Women.

Mr Le'aupepe said what has happened to Samoa and its people is because they have violated God's ordinances.

He said Samoans have destroyed and ignored the laws of God and placed more weight on laws of the world.

The chairman said the solution for the problem is for government to seek assistance from the National Council of Churches in calling a national day of repentance.

Call for Samoa's chiefs and orators to help stop domestic violence

MP Fa'aulusau Rosa Stowers, told Newsline Samoa the village councils have the authority to regulate by laws in the villages, and can be the most effective response to domestic violence.

She asked that if traditional councils were effective in their regulatory role on serious police offences in the villages, why not extend this same authority to those who commit violence against women and children.

Samoa PM urges action over family violence

The time for talking was over and action was needed said Tuilaepa as he launched a report following a national public inquiry into the matter.

The Report of the National Public Inquiry into Family Violence said there was a 'veil of silence' over domestic violence in the country and it pointed at the government, the church and village institutions saying they were among those shouldering the blame.

It was time to address the issue head on said the Prime Minister and for those in power to stand up and be counted.

Rihanna accuses Snapchat of 'shaming' domestic violence victims

The singer was the subject of an advert on the platform which asked users if they would "rather slap Rihanna or punch Chris Brown".

The ad, which was for a game, appeared to reference Chris Brown's conviction for assaulting Rihanna in 2009 while they were dating.

Snap Inc says the ad "never should have appeared on our service".

Rihanna posted a lengthy comment on an Instagram Story saying she was "trying to figure out what the point was with this mess".

"I'd love to call it ignorance, but I know you ain't that dumb," she wrote.