North Korea

Kim Jong Un invites the world to see his new symbol of strength

They didn't say where we were going, what we would be doing or who would be there. In the past, a "major event" has meant being taken to see North Korea's Supreme Leader, Kim Jong Un.

Trump, Chinese leader face North Korea dilemma

As Trump and President Xi Jinping meet for their first summit, Pyongyang's aggressive pursuit of nuclear and missile expertise will top the agenda. US officials warn that the era of what's known as strategic patience is over.

North Korea fires a possible ballistic missile

The United States believes the projectile was likely a ballistic missile, according to a US official. It is one of several the country has test-fired in recent months.

How forbidden book was smuggled out of N. Korea

Written by a dissident writer still living inside the country, "The Accusation; Forbidden Stories from Inside North Korea" is a collection of short stories about the lives of regular people, who live without freedom and under constant scrutiny.

Officially fiction, the book is considered to be a reflection of life under North Korean rule. The author is known simply as "Bandi", Korean for firefly, a pen name he apparently chose himself.

Trump: US will act unilaterally on North Korea if necessary

"China will either decide to help us with North Korea or they won't," Trump said in an interview published Sunday in the Financial Times. "If they do, that will be very good for China, and if they don't, it won't be good for anyone."

Kim Jong-nam: Body 'arrives in Pyongyang' in exchange deal

North Korea had requested the body, but has not confirmed its identity.

It was released as part of a deal under which nine Malaysians previously prevented from leaving North Korea have now arrived home.

The two countries had been locked in a diplomatic row in the wake of the killing in Kuala Lumpur last month.

Both countries had banned each other's citizens from leaving.

Three North Koreans have been allowed to leave Malaysia, Malaysia's chief of police said.

Malaysians held in North Korea return home

The nine Malaysian nationals were met by their relatives and a large media contingent at Kuala Lumpur airport early on Friday.The quarrel, over last month's killing of Kim Jong-nam in Kuala Lumpur, had resulted in both countries banning each other's citizens from leaving.

Malaysia has also allowed North Koreans to leave and released Mr Kim's body.

There is widespread suspicion that Pyongyang was responsible for orchestrating Mr Kim's murder.

Kim Jong-nam's body released to North Korea

Prime Minister Najib Razak said a coroner had approved the release of Kim Jong-nam's body.

Mr Kim was murdered at Kuala Lumpur airport with a lethal nerve agent last month.

The assassination led to a major diplomatic dispute between Malaysia and North Korea.

Malaysia has not directly blamed North Korea for the killing, but there is widespread suspicion that Pyongyang was responsible.

Meanwhile, nine Malaysians who had been barred from leaving North Korea returned to Malaysia early on Friday. They include three embassy staff and six family members.

North Korea missile launch 'fails'

"South Korea and the United States are aware of the North Korean missile launch and suspect it was a failure," said a spokesman for Seoul's military.

It is not clear how many missiles were fired or what type was being tested.

North Korea has conducted missile tests with increasing frequency and experts say this is likely to lead to advances in its missile technology.

Earlier this month, the North fired four missiles that flew about 1,000km (620 miles) landing in Japanese waters.

North Korea is banned from any missile or nuclear tests by the United Nations.

Military action against North Korea an option 'on the table': Tillerson

Mr Tillerson outlined the tougher strategy to confront North Korea's nuclear threat while visiting South Korea on his three-country tour of Asia.

He also closed the door on talks with Pyongyang unless it denuclearised and gave up its weapons of mass destruction.

When asked about the possibility of using military force, Mr Tillerson told a news conference in the South Korean capital: "All of the options are on the table".